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Campus News

Documentary on Porn Shown Shortly After Warren Wilson Administration Shuts Down Bike Porn Screening

by Nathan Gower, staff writer

On Wednesday, Nov. 30, senior Tim Comstock and sophomore Steph Cheung screened The Price of Pleasure: Pornography, Sexuality and Relationships, a documentary about pornography’s impact on sexual practices, at the Jensen Lecture Hall.

The film criticizes the way pornography, as one of the most profitable cultural mediums, promotes skewed sexual behaviors, particularly through sexism, racism, and violence. The film highlights how this behavior becomes practiced in the viewer of pornography’s private sexual life.

“We’re critical of the way an industry capitalizes and makes films for monetary gain. [Pornographic] films are affecting our sex lives, so in effect profit motive is affecting our sex lives by extension,” said Comstock.

Comstock added that he is not against pornography as a medium, but rather the vast majority of pornography that tenses to promote these negative sexual behaviors.

The screening happened with little to no fuss from the administration, who recently denied residents of Preston House the opportunity to screen what is referred to as ‘Bike Porn.’ This genre of pornography is often regarded as a ‘healthier’ portrayal of sexual activity than its mainstream counterpart.

The administration, who denied Preston House’s screening of ‘Bike Porn,’ felt otherwise. Dean of Students Deb Myers provided the rationale that, as Preston House is a common space, they would be violating public decency standards by screening the Bike Porn.

The event was well advertised, however, and the likelihood of anyone accidentally stumbling into the residence, situated afar from most student dormitories, seems quite a stretch.

Furthermore, Myers acknowledged that academic discussions of pornography are healthy and encouraged students to develop a program that could carry out such an agenda.

It seems the administration is drawing a peculiar line of censorship in their permitting one but denying another of ‘academic’ porn-centric films.

Deb Myers declined the Echo’s request to be interviewed.

Comstock was careful not to take sides but did see a tension between students and the administration.

“I’m not critical of [the administration] for saying that Preston couldn’t have that movie played in their common space, but maybe they could have offered some other solution. I do think there should be more discussion and open dialogue about sexuality and sexual media,” he said.

Comstock added, “It’s tough to say at what point you’re censoring something and what point you’re preventing something that’s violent. Somebody needs to gauge how much this is going to be beneficial to people’s relationships and practices or whether this is going to promote unhealthy gender-binary power dynamics. You really have to be careful, I think that’s the take home message, not that it should be one way or another.”

Discussion

2 Responses to “Documentary on Porn Shown Shortly After Warren Wilson Administration Shuts Down Bike Porn Screening”

  1. What defines a common space? Why wouldn’t Jensen be considered a common space?

    I like Tim’s “take home” point.

    Posted by Maddy Dillon | December 7, 2011, 7:34 pm
  2. In the school’s defense, our country has reached a heightened state of anti-intellectualism. Therefore, showing porn in a “Lecture Hall” is acceptable on account that nobody’s in there in the first place.

    Posted by Rev. Rex James | December 9, 2011, 2:08 am

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