Warren Wilson College News

Game summary — WWC women’s soccer vs. So. Virginia

Southern Virginia College is the only Mormon school on the
east coast; everyone in the small college perched on a
hill in Buena Vista is an athlete, and everyone is on
scholarship. Our women beat them once in 1998, then lost
to them later that year in the first women’s Small College
Athletic Association National Tournament hosted by yours
truly, WWC. Southern Virginia has either won or placed in
the Nationals in our division since 1998, and we have not
beat them since.

The Owls tied them in double overtime last year on their
field; we got knocked out of post season play by a bad
sound system that rang a bell too soon; they went on to
win the National Title, again.

Coach Enos started with a prayer meetin in the locker room
and she drew diagrams with X’s and arrows and delivered an
inspiring speech. When we got to the field, the squeaky
clean,
we-don’t-drink-and-we-don’t-chew-and-we-don’t-go-with-the-
boys-that-do Mormon girls were already warming up. The
hooters pulled of their shirts (couldn’t find our warm-up
jerseys) and warmed up with our little tiny scrimmages
while defenders practiced long balls; we finished up
shooting on the Fabulous Moolah Schonberg.

It was too hard to count the Wilson alumni under the
special tent, but there were a whopping 60 Hooter fans in
the bleachers across the field.

The whistle blew and the Hooter defense worked hard to
remember Stacey’s arrows and X’s and it was working:
Schonberg, Bangasser, Woychowski, Sweet Chastity Conley
and Dynamo Holzer stopped nine shots on goal and made two
corner saves: All Action Witt, Amanda Poison Ivy
Williamson, and Christy von Barron controlled the ball in
the midfield, but our offense kept getting caught in their
very good offsides trap, so, thirty minutes into the game,
we had only taken two shots on their net.

A tough thirty two minutes after the starting whistle,
Shannon Waldron Little Cloud avoided the fast and pure
sweeper that was playing so well in the middle; Shannon
took the ball to the far left side of the field and let
loose a stunning shot just before two raging Lady Knights,
frustrated from years of no coffee or sweet tea, could
bowl into her. That shot had been waiting in Shannon’s
legs for two years and Sweet Chastity knew, being a keeper
turned field player herself, that it was just the kind of
a shot keepers hate–starting from a blind angle, too high
for the sweeper to take in the air, too high for the
keeper to knock over the bar, and so sweet that the fans
have a name for it–an upper 90 shot. Shannon’s goal put
us ahead 1-0 at the half.

In the second half, Sadie Delilah Adams, Psycho Thunder
Kid Gaskin and Serena the Giant Shah tried and tried to
outrun sweeper #4 in the black and white jersey without
success, but the sweeper was tired, and so were the their
fullbacks. Shannon saw the fatigue, opened another can of
Whoop Knight, tried a run on the other side, got to the
right hand corner flag, shot and scored again in the 50th
minute of the game. Now it's good ones 2, mormon ones 0.

After that, we only got off five shots, not because we
weren’t putting a hurtin on them, but because of their
well executed trap, we couldn’t get within 40 yards of
their net. We wanted more scores, we wanted Ellie Amani
to play for her dad visiting from Guatemala, Lizzy Doyle
to play and do something powerful with that great speed in
her legs, Hae Ri Kim to relieve the pains in her tummy by
a few full field runs, and wonderful Laura Cohen to join
her Chicago buddy in the middle and make the Midwest
proud.

But we can’t take out starters when it’s tight, and in
minute 74, Virginia’s Maryellen Bunting got past everyone
and scored, and she did it again in the 80th minute (there
are only 90 minutes in regulation play) bringing the game
to 2-2: good for both teams in terms of getting a
possible bid for the Nationals, but bad for both teams who
desperately wanted to win.

When the 90 minute whistle blew, the Owls and Knights were
faced with two ten minutes halves that end the moment a
goal is made by either team or when the time runs up. If
it ends tied after two overtimes, the teams take a tie.

The first ten minutes ran out with no shots from the Owls
and two from the Knights, one on the face saved by a gutsy
move from Rachel Schonberg.

We started the second overtime with the original lineup;
Sadie was running their fullbacks and her fierce legs
ragged, so with four minutes left in the game, we put in
Lauren Love Kriel on the front line. Lauren plays like a
wild stallion might play if we could make shin guards stay
up on horse legs and get them to look good in nylon
shorts; her strength is her speed and first touch on the
ball while running full speed down the field.

With minutes left to play in the second golden goal
overtime, Lauren beat their defense, found herself running
with two Knights at her shoulder, a goalie coming out at
her, and no teammate to pass to. In her peripheral vision
she saw a body on the left, a body on the right, and the
goal post. She didn’t see the keeper coming off her line.
The crowd grew still. Would she shoot too soon and give
it to the keeper coming out to cut off the angle, would
she shoot too hard over the top of the goal, would the
defenders catch her? Before we could answer those
difficult questions, she shot the ball just beyond the
oncoming keeper, low, hard and on the ground where it
rolled with perfect speed into the middle of the net, no
risk of it blowing over the top or out wide.

In a golden goal game, the game stops the moment that a
ball crosses the line into the goal. Before the ball was
stopped by the back of the net, Laura lept into the air
with her fist high in jubilation, the team surrounded her
with white and green love, and the Dean of the College
came out in a golden Cadillac, scooped the team on the
hood and did donuts in the field (just kidding about the
donut part).

Our next home game is Thursday Oct. 19 at 4:00 against
Emory and Henry College from Virginia.

Come out and see good triumph over the evil.

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